Misty Ring-Ramirez

About Misty Ring-Ramirez

Misty Ring-Ramirez is an ABD Ph.D. student in sociology.  Her research interests include organizations, especially social movement and non-profit organizations, statistics and research methods, and social networks and social network analysis.

In addition to teaching, Misty has worked on the following research projects: 

  • “Collaborative Research: University Commitment to Interdisciplinary Research: Scope, Causes, and Consequences.” Co-PIs Erin Leahey and Sondra Barringer. Research Assistant on National Science Foundation grant (SMA-1461989). Fall 2015-present.
  • “Homeownership and Societal Stability: Assessing Causal Effects in Central Eurasia.” Co-PIs Ted Gerber and Jane Zavisca. Research Assistant on Minerva Research Award. Summer 2015.
  • “Collaborative Research: Collective Action Dynamics in the U.S., 1960-1995.” PI Jennifer Earl.  Research Assistant and Lab Manager on National Science Foundation grant (SES-1154896). Fall 2012-Spring 2014.
  • “Youth Activism Project.” PI Jennifer Earl. Research Assistant on MacArthur Foundation grant, Summer 2013.

Before coming to the University of Arizona, Misty received her MA in Latin American Studies from the University of New Mexico and her BA in Spanish and International Studies from Texas Lutheran University.  She has experience teaching Spanish at both the high school and university level. 

Research Interests

Research Methods, Statistics, Social Movements/Social Movement Organizations, Non-profit Organizations, Social Networks, Social Network Analysis, Urban Communities, Latin America and the US/Mexico Border Region

Selected Publications

Ring-Ramirez, Misty, Heidi Reynolds-Stenson and Jennifer Earl. 2014. “Culturally Constrained Contention: Mapping the Meaning Structure of the Repertoire of Contention.” Mobilization 19(4): 405-419.

Misty Ring-Ramirez's picture

Contact Information

Misty Ring-Ramirez
Telephone: (520) 621-1089
Office: Soc Sci 426
CV:

CV

Dissertation Title

An Interorganizational Network Analysis of the Social Movement Sector in New York, 1960-1995 (working title)

Courses Taught

Instructor of record: Introduction to Sociology (SOC101), Collective Behavior and Social Movements (SOC313), Urban Communities (SOC432), Schools, Students, and Society (SOC280) 

TA: Basic Quantitative Methods (SOC569), Urban Communities (SOC432), Social Statistics, Undergraduate Level (SOC274), Research Methods (SOC275), Social Statistics, Graduate Level ( SOC570A and SOC570B), Latin America, Globalization, and Development (SOC384)